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Everything about Wellesley University

Everything about Wellesley University

Total Undergraduate Enrollment: 2,534

Institutional Type: Private

Curricular Flexibility: Somewhat Flexible

Academic Rating: 5

Top Programs:

Total Undergraduate Enrollment: 2,534

Institutional Type: Private

Curricular Flexibility: Somewhat Flexible

Academic Rating: 5

Who Recruits:

1. Boston Consulting Group

2. Teach for America

3. U.S. Federal Reserve

4. Massachusetts General Hospital

5. State Street

Notable Internships:

1. Metropolitan Museum of Art

2. American Express

3. Dick Clark Productions

Top Industries:

1. Boston Consulting Group

2. Teach for America

3. U.S. Federal Reserve

4. Massachusetts General Hospital

5. State Street

Top Employers:

1. Business

2. Education

3. Research

4. Media

5. Social Services

Where Alumni Work:

1. Boston

2. New York City

3. San Francisco

4. Washington, DC

5. Los Angeles

Median Earnings:

College Scorecard (Early Career): $60,800

EOP (Early Career): $56,300

PayScale (Mid-Career): $106,200

Inside the Classroom

In 1995, the New York Times proclaimed, “More than any other college—large or small— Wellesley has groomed women who shatter the glass ceiling.” Twenty five years later, Barnard has surpassed Wellesley for the lowest acceptance rate among women’s colleges, but Wellesley’s picture-perfect campus in suburban Boston remains the premier pipeline to the boardrooms of America’s most powerful companies as well as to the highest levels of politics. Students are known to be a driven bunch as committed to full engagement with campus activities as they are to the exceptionally rigorous classroom experience.

The college’s 2,350 undergraduate students can select from fifty departmental and interdisciplinary majors, and economics, biology, and computer science are the most frequently conferred degrees. All freshmen must complete an expository writing course, and all seniors must demonstrate foreign language proficiency. In between, students are required to complete coursework in natural and physical science, mathematical modellin and problem solving, social and behavioral analysis, language and literature, art/music/theatre/film/video, epistemology and cognition, historical studies, and religion/ethics/moral philosophy. There is also a multicultural and an uncredited physical education requirement.

The student-to-faculty ratio is only 8:1, leading to average class sizes in the seventeen- to twenty-student range. Twenty percent of course sections have single-digit enrollments while two-thirds have fewer than nineteen students. With no graduate students to compete with, opportunities for participation in research with faculty members abound. The Summer Science Research Program is cited by many graduates as the most influential part of their educational experience. Wellesley students also regularly land research positions with the National Institutes of Health, Harvard Medical School, MIT, and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The Office of International Studies facilitates the overseas study of hundreds of students each year with 45 percent of juniors spending a semester in one of 160 programs worldwide.

The entire undergraduate program at Wellesley is revered by top corporations and graduate schools alike. Most programs possess sterling reputations, including chemistry, computer science, neuroscience, and political science. However, the Department of Economics appears to shine most brightly, leading many into PhD programs and high-profile careers.

Outside the Classroom

In 1995, the New York Times proclaimed, “More than any other college—large or small— Wellesley has groomed women who shatter the glass ceiling.” Twenty five years later, Barnard has surpassed Wellesley for the lowest rate among women’s colleges, but Wellesley’s picture-perfect campus in suburban Boston remains the premier pipeline to the boardrooms of America’s most powerful companies as well as to the highest levels of politics. Students are known to be a driven bunch as committed to full engagement with campus activities as they are to the exceptionally rigorous classroom experience.

The college’s 2,350 undergraduate students can select from fifty departmental and interdisciplinary majors, and economics, biology, and computer science are the most frequently conferred degrees. All freshmen must complete an expository writing course, and all seniors must demonstrate foreign language proficiency. In between, students are required to complete coursework in natural and physical science, mathematical modeling and problem solving, social and behavioral analysis, language and literature, art/music/theater/film/video, epistemology and cognition, historical studies, and religion/ethics/moral philosophy. There is also a multicultural and an uncredited physical education requirement.

The student-to-faculty ratio is only 8:1, leading to average class sizes in the seventeen- to twenty-student range. Twenty percent of course sections have single-digit enrollments while two-thirds have fewer than nineteen students. With no graduate students to compete with, opportunities for participation in research with faculty members abound. The Summer Science Research Program is cited by many graduates as the most influential part of their educational experience. Wellesley students also regularly land research positions with the National Institutes of Health, Harvard Medical School, MIT, and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The Office of International Studies facilitates the overseas study of hundreds of students each year with 45 percent of juniors spending a semester in one of 160 programs worldwide.

The entire undergraduate program at Wellesley is revered by top corporations and graduate schools alike. Most programs possess sterling reputations, including chemistry, computer science, neuroscience, and political science. However, the Department of Economics appears to shine most brightly, leading many into PhD programs and high-profile careers.

Career Services

The Wellesley Career Education Office is staffed by thirty professionals working in career counseling, internships, fellowships, experiential learning, and employer relations. For a school with 2,350 students, the size and scope of this office is remarkable. The 78:1 student-to-advisor ratio is unmatched by any institution in the country. It’s no wonder that the National Association of Colleges and Employers named Wellesley the winner of the Career Service Excellence Award among small colleges; the department has been similarly recognized multiple times by national organizations for its superior career service offerings. Staff members regularly present at national conferences and publish on the topic of career preparation.

Last year's graduating class had a 98 percent satisfaction rate after in- person, one-on-one appointments. Almost 90 percent of undergraduates complete at least one internship, including so-called Signature Internships with “leading cultural, educational, and scientific institutions; international agencies; media outlets; advocacy and community organizations; and businesses” around the globe. Last year, 80 percent of the undergraduate population engaged faceto-face with career services, and 98 percent engaged digitally. Outreach begins freshman year as 82 percent of firstyears meet in person with a career counselor. The annual total of advising sessions exceeds 6,500. There were 275 events held with a total attendance of 4,690, and thirty-three employers engaged in on-campus interviews including Google, Microsoft, Citi, and the US Department of Commerce. Unlike some of the other Seven Sister institutions, opportunities at the world’s premier companies are commonplace, and salaries are higher than average. With superb resources and equally strong outcomes, the Wellesley Career Education Office deserves all of the many accolades that have been heaped upon it.

Professional Outcomes

Six months after earning their degrees, 96 percent of last year's class had already achieved positive outcomes. Of the three-quarters of grads who were employed, 24 percent were working in the finance/consulting/business fields, 18 percent in education, 15 percent in internet and software/technology/engineering, and 13 percent in health care/life sciences. The top employers were Accenture, Google, JP Morgan, Boston Children’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and a number of top universities that included Harvard and MIT. One hundred thirty-three members of the Class were employed in Boston, sixty-nine in New York, fifty in California, and twenty-seven in Washington, DC. The average starting salary was a solid $59,000 with an average bonus of $11,000. Wellesley grads almost universally go on to elite graduate programs. Of the 17 percent of grads who directly entered an advanced degree program, the top dozen most common schools attended included Ivies Harvard, Columbia, Brown, Penn, and Cornell and other upper-crust institutions at Stanford, MIT, Emory, NYU, Brandeis, Boston University, and the Olin College of Engineering. Medical school applicants are generally successful; from 2008-2018 an average of 72 percent of med school hopefuls were accepted by at least one university. Three or more recent grads have been accepted into medical school at Dartmouth, Tufts, Case Western, Boston University, and Northwestern. Law school acceptance rates hover in the low-to-mid 80s, a figure that is lowered by the caliber of law schools to which Wellesley grads typically apply. Law schools that accepted a minimum of three alumni in recent years include Yale, Duke, Harvard, Georgetown, Cornell, Pennand, UCBerkeley.

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