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Analysis

Each body paragraph should follow the Quote, Interpret, Significance (QIS) Pattern. When you are analyzing the passage, you will quote an excerpt, interpret that quote, and state the significance of how this element of persuasion helps build the author’s argument. For example, you may quote how the author cites an authority in the passage, interpret what the authority said, and write about how citing this particular authority adds credibility to the author’s argument.

Essentially, QIS is a formulaic way of conducting an analysis with elements of evidence, persuasion, and reasoning.

Let’s go over an example of how we would use this method on Paul Bogard’s “Let there be dark” passage we have been working with.

1. Quote

  • Bogard starts his article off by recounting a personal story - a summer spent on a Minnesota lake where there was “woods so dark that … before [his] eyes.” Start by quoting the passage. But notice how I use an ellipsis (…) instead of writing out the entire quote. This is perfectly okay.

2. Interpret

  • In telling this brief anecdote, Bogard recalls a time when he could fully amass himself in natural darkness void of artificial light.

After you have quoted/paraphrased a particular element, you should interpret it. In this case, I do not mention how the quote enhances the author’s argument. Instead, I interpret the quote itself.

3. Significance

  • By drawing in his readers with a personal encounter about night darkness, the author means to establish the potential for beauty, glamour, and awe-inspiring mystery that genuine darkness can possess.

Finally, clarify the significance of the author’s use of the element of persuasion by stating how it contributes to the author’s overall argument. That’s it! This is how you effectively conduct your analysis when writing your Essay. Simply do QIS two to four times in your body paragraphs and you will have an essay full of powerful insights.

However, there is one more part of QIS that is not part of the acronym: Connect. In order to transition between your QIS analyses, you should try to link and connect them smoothly. Here is an example of how I would connect the previous QIS analysis with the next quote:

4. Connect

  • Bogard’s argument is also furthered by his use of allusion to art Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”.

This sentence smoothly transitions from the discussion of one element to the next, providing cohesion to your paragraph.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

More Topics

The SAT Essay Template

This chapter will introduce a repeatable framework that will make SAT essay writing easy and ensure you get a great score.

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Analysis

The previous chapters laid out the rhetorical elements to identify in a prompt, but how do these elements get translated from the prompt to your sat essay? In this chapter, we’ll discuss how you should fill out each body paragraph.

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Reasoning

Reasoning is the connective tissue that holds an argument together. It's the “thinking” — the logic, the analysis — that develops the argument and ties the claim and evidence together.

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Stylistic & Persuasive Elements

Stylistic and persuasive elements are in a way opposite to the evidence based elements discussed in the last chapter. They are NON-FACT based statements that the author uses to prove his thesis. They often appeal to your emotions.

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The Evidence

The first of the three points that the SAT wants you to write about is identifying the evidence the author uses in his essay to prove his thesis.

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The Thesis

The most important task for a student on the SAT essay is to understand the author’s purpose in writing the essay. The purpose in fancier words is called the thesis of the essay.

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Intro to SAT Essay

The SAT essay is optional. It is graded out of 24 points. Your score will show up next to your “1600” score, but it won’t actually affect it in any way.

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Effective Writing Toolkit

We have discussed how to write an ACT essay and respond to the prompts. Now, it’s the time to help you write the essay better using varied sentence structures and correct grammar usage.

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